coffinteeth

oncemorebefore:

ryanpanos:

Half Abandoned | Camilo José Vergara | Via

Physically conjoined by separately sold upon construction, the lives of paired buildings (ones that share a common wall) can diverge dramatically as this photo series poignantly illustrates. In various cases, one half is occupied by squatters, filled with trash, burned out by a fire, boarded up, simply deserted or even entirely demolished.

This approach epitomizes a theme common to his work, which frequently focuses on showing change over time. Like twins separated at birth, these dual buildings (once mirror images of each other) are uniquely illustrative of change. They are found particularly often in Camden, a place with a long history of struggling against decline.

Looks like downtown Albany

pictionarywithmythoughts

oncemorebefore:

ryanpanos:

Half Abandoned | Camilo José Vergara | Via

Physically conjoined by separately sold upon construction, the lives of paired buildings (ones that share a common wall) can diverge dramatically as this photo series poignantly illustrates. In various cases, one half is occupied by squatters, filled with trash, burned out by a fire, boarded up, simply deserted or even entirely demolished.

This approach epitomizes a theme common to his work, which frequently focuses on showing change over time. Like twins separated at birth, these dual buildings (once mirror images of each other) are uniquely illustrative of change. They are found particularly often in Camden, a place with a long history of struggling against decline.

Looks like downtown Albany

jumberlack

thirdoffive:

The mummified heart of a Norse giant.

While going through his famous grandfather’s belongings after his passing in 1937, violinist Lars Sigerson discovered this casket. It appears to have been passed from generation to generation within his family for hundreds of years. The explanation and whatever story that goes with it has been lost to the ages.

The inscription on the casket is written in old Norse runes and reads:
“Behold! Within this casket lies the heart of the fierce and terrible giant known as Hrungnir, slain this day by Fafrd the Red whose bravery and cunning shall live forever!”

devyndelrey

mylittlerewolution:

Did you know that you can make houses out of plastic bottles? By filling them with sand, and molding them together with mud or cement, the walls created are actually bullet proof, fire proof, and will maintain an comfortable indoor temperature of 64 degrees in the summer time.

And it’s not like there is any shortage on used plastic bottles out there. Here are some statistics from treehugger.com:

“The United States uses 129.6 Million plastic bottles per day which is 47.3 Billion plastic bottles per year. About 80% of those plastic bottles end up in a landfill!”

To build a two bedroom, 1200 square foot home, it takes about 14,000 bottles.

The United States throws away enough plastic bottles to build 9257 of these 2 bedroom houses per day! That’s just over 3.35 million homes, the same number of homeless people in America.

Many people in third world countries have taken up building homes out of plastic bottles, from Africa to Asia. Perhaps the trend will catch on in America and all of those bottles will stop ending up in the landfills. Wouldn’t they be better off housing the homeless? Kinda like all those empty houses scattered all over the country?

This is dope